Skip To Main Content

COVID-19 Updates and Resources. Learn More

NEW STUDY: THE MORE SUGAR, THE MORE CARDIOVASCULAR RISK

April 27, 2010

Want to cut your risk for having a heart attack or a stroke? Cut out added sugars. Just to be clear, added sugar is, as the name implies, a caloric sweetener added to a processed or prepared food. The classic added sugar, of course, is the table sugar most people add to their tea, coffee, cereal—you name it. Natural sugars in fruit, vegetables, dairy products and other whole foods are integral—meaning not added. The easiest way to banish added sugars is to follow the Atkins Diet. At its heart, Atkins is a low-sugar diet and a no-added sugar diet.

It’s well know that a high-carb diet is associated with a lipid profile that increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, but until now researchers haven’t looked specifically at the role of added sugar. A study just published in the Journal of the American Medical Association has done just that. The researchers examined the added sugar consumption of more than 6,100 men and women who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 1999 to 2006. This program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of Americans combined interviews with physical examinations. The researchers grouped the respondents into five groups, ranging from those who consumed less than 5 percent of total calories as added sugars to those whose intake was 25 percent or more.

Anyone who has adopted the Atkins Diet as his or her lifestyle won’t be surprised by the findings, and Atkins “newbies” will be happy to hear them. The researches found that the more added sugar the study participants consumed, the worse their lipid profiles, specifically:

Triglyceride levels were higher.

HDL (“good”) cholesterol levels were lower.

The ratio of triglycerides to HDL (good) cholesterol was higher.

Women’s LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels were higher (but not men’s).

People who consumed 10 percent or more of their calories as added sugar were 50 to 300 percent more likely to have low HDL levels than individuals who consumed just 5 percent or less of their calories as added sugar. As the researchers summarized, “In this study, there was a statistically significant correlation between dietary added sugars and blood lipid levels among U.S. adults.”

This groundbreaking study is another reason to stop obsessing about fat and put the blame for lipid problems where it belongs. The real culprit is a diet high in processed foods full of added sugar and other refined carbohydrates. I suggest you share the result of this study with any friends or family who aren’t yet convinced that doing Atkins is not just effective for weight loss, it’s also a prescription for good health.

Register with Atkins today for additional tips, low carb recipes, and ideas on how to overcome your weight loss plateau.

More From Colette

Keto and Low Carb Recipes for Father’s Day 2021

If you’ve been working hard to transform your physique from sedentary “dad bod” to muscular and active, these Father’s Day keto and low carb recipes will go hand-in-hand with your low carb lifestyle.

Read More »

What’s the Best "Milk" for Keto?

Whole, low fat or skim milk contain about 7 grams of Net Carbs per cup or more, which may not be compatible with your keto or low carb lifestyle.

Read More »

What to do Memorial Day Weekend 2021

What better way to kick off the traditional start of summertime fun than by spending some time in the great outdoors? Whether it’s in your back yard or at a campground, a low carb campout is a great way to safely celebrate Memorial Day with family and friends.

Read More »

The Scoop on Added Sugar

The average American eats 17 teaspoons of added sugar a day, and excess sugar consumption has been linked with health issues such as obesity, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes.

Read More »

FAQs

Have more low carb questions? We've got the answers!

Learn More »
FAQs

Free Tools

Access meal plans, carb counters, discussion boards, and more.

Learn More »
Free Tools

FAQs

Have more low carb questions? We've got the answers!

Learn More »
FAQs

Free Tools

Access meal plans, carb counters, discussion boards, and more.

Learn More »
Free Tools

This site uses essential cookies to function. It also uses non-essential cookies for marketing and advertising. For more information please see ourPrivacy Policy.

This site uses essential cookies to function. It also uses non-essential cookies for marketing and advertising. For more information please see ourPrivacy Policy.

Close button