Atkins Diet Plan Ideal for Those with Fat Preference Gene

DENVER, Feb. 13, 2012 -- According to a new study the preference for fatty foods has a genetic basis, and those with certain forms of the CD36 gene may like high-fat foods more than those who have other forms of this gene. The results may help explain why some people struggle when placed on a low-fat diet and may one day assist people in selecting diets that are the best fit for them to follow. Atkins™, the original and leading low-carb weight-loss plan based on an extensive scientific body of research, is a better alternative for those who require a low-carb, higher-fat diet in order to lose and maintain weight.

"Fat is universally palatable to humans," says lead author Kathleen Keller, assistant professor of nutritional sciences, Penn State. "Yet we have demonstrated for the first time that people who have particular forms of the CD36 gene tend to like higher-fat foods more and may be at greater risk for obesity compared to those who do not have this form of the gene. Our study is one of the first to show this relationship in humans."

According to Colette Heimowitz, M.Sc., vice president of nutrition and education for Atkins Nutritionals, Inc., "This study illustrates why some diets simply do not work for certain people who would fare better on a higher-fat, low-carbohydrate plan. We already know that Atkins offers a scientifically proven alternative that delivers better weight loss and health marker improvements among those who have carb intolerance, including those with metabolic syndrome, pre-diabetes or insulin resistance. Now we have a test that can help individuals identify their individual tendency and therefore prevent issues of sugar metabolism disorders by following a higher-fat, lower-carbohydrate program before obesity occurs."

Given that the Atkins Diet™ reduces carbohydrates during weight loss, the dieter is directed to increase their healthy carb intake until they find their personal carb balance – the level where their body can effectively metabolize carbs and burn fat for fuel while maintaining long-term weight loss. Atkins is unique in that no other weight-loss and maintenance program does this. The Atkins Diet is backed by more than 80 published, peer-reviewed studies conducted over the past several decades.

The study "Common Variants in the CD36 Gene are Associated with Oral Fat Perception, Fat Preferences, and Obesity in African Americans," was led by a team of scientists from Penn State, Columbia University and Rutgers University who examined 317 African-American males and females because individuals in this ethnic group are highly vulnerable to obesity and thus are at greatest risk for obesity-related diseases.

"Our results may help explain why some people have more difficulty adhering to a low-fat diet than others and why these same people often have better compliance when they adopt higher-fat, low-carbohydrate diets. The Atkins Diet is one example," says Keller.

About Atkins Nutritionals, Inc.

Atkins Nutritionals, Inc. is a leader in the $2.4 billion weight control nutrition category, and offers a powerful lifetime approach to weight loss and management. The Atkins Diet focuses on a healthy diet with reduced levels of refined carbohydrates and added sugars and encourages the consumption of protein, fiber, fruits, vegetables and good fats. Backed by research and consumer success stories, this approach allows the body to burn more fat and work more efficiently while helping individuals feel less hungry, more satisfied and more energetic.

Atkins Nutritionals, Inc., manufactures and sells a variety of nutrition bars and shakes designed around the nutritional principles of the Atkins Diet™. Atkins' four product lines: Advantage®, Day Break™, Endulge™ and Cuisine™ appeal to a broad audience of both men and women who want to achieve their weight management goals and enjoy a healthier lifestyle. Atkins products are available online at atkins.com and in more than 30,000 locations throughout the U.S. and internationally. For more information, visit atkins.com.