A Vitamin Regimen for Optimal Health

An integral part of making healthy lifestyle choices is to simultaneously adopt a supplement program, with a multi vitamin formula, that contains certain nutrients -- including chromium, pantethine, selenium, vanadium and biotin -- which play a role in regulating blood sugar and insulin, as well as in burning fat. It should also include additional amounts of antioxidants.

  • Chromium, which deserves the most attention, helps activate the uptake of insulin at its receptor sites. It is best assimilated in the form of chromium polynicotinate. A spate of studies has shown that chromium will build muscle, decrease body fat and lower cholesterol levels1. Dose: 300 mcg is sufficient for most individuals while others may need up to 800 to 1,000 mcg per day.
  • Pantethine (vitamin B5) is a remarkable nutrient that helps control cholesterol, supports the adrenals and produces "friendly" bacteria in the intestine, making it a valuable tool in preventing yeast overgrowth2. Dose: 20 mgs should be sufficient for most people; those who are metabolically resistant in the extreme may need to take an additional supplement.
  • Selenium is a powerful antioxidant. It may also play a beneficial nutritional role in preventing diabetes. Dose:50 mcg is sufficient.
  • Vanadium (vanadyl sulfate) is a trace mineral that dramatically aids diabetics, apparently by helping cells absorb blood sugar more effectively and thereby decreasing the need for insulin. Dose: 40 mcg; people with diabetes or pre-diabetic conditions may require as much as 100 mcg daily.
  • Biotin is an unsung B vitamin whose nutritional role was emphasized by a study that noted a significant drop in diabetics' blood-sugar levels after taking the supplement3. Dose: 150 mcg of biotin.

Selected References:

  1. Evan, G.W., "The Effects of Chromium Picolinate on Insulin Controlled Parameters in Humans," International Journal of Biosocial Medical Research, 11, 1989, pages 163-180.
  2. Cattin, L., "Treatment of Hypercholesterolemia With Pantethine and Fenofibrate: An Open Randomized Study on 43 Subjects," Current Theories in Research, 38(3), 1985, pages 386-395.
  3. Coggeshall, J.C., Heggers, J.P., Robson, M.C., et al., "Biotin Status and Plasma Glucose in Diabetics," Annals of New York Academy of Science, 447, 1985, pages 389-392.
Disclaimer: Nothing contained on this Site is intended to provide health care advice. Should you have any health care-related questions, please call or see your physician or other health care provider. Consult your physician or health care provider before beginning the Atkins Diet as you would any other weight loss or weight maintenance program. The weight loss phases of the Atkins Diet should not be used by persons on dialysis or by pregnant or nursing women.