SCIENCE: ARTICLES & LIBRARY


November is National Diabetes Month, a time to shine a spotlight on diabetes prevention and control. This challenging disease affects millions of people, but it can be prevented and controlled through important lifestyle changes. Here’s what you need to know:

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The American Diabetes Association, an organization whose mission statement is "to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by (it)", clearly has it's heart in the right place. Trouble is, in our opinion, they've traditionally been behind the curve of cutting edge science and research when it comes to dietary recommendations.   MORE
Childhood obesity is now an epidemic, and childhood diabetes is right behind it. And we’re not talking about type 1 diabetes.  Rather, it’s type 2 diabetes. Ironically, this used to be called adult-onset diabetes because kids never had it.  Now it’s turning up in younger and younger children. The estimates are truly terrifying: one in three children  born in the year 2000 will develop diabetes as an adult.   MORE
Over the years, thousands of people have turned to the Atkins dietary strategy of reduced sugar and carbohydrates for its demonstrated ability to help people lose weight and keep it off. But in the last decade, emerging research has shown over and over again, that the Atkins diet can actually accomplish even more than that. Studies have shown improvements in cholesterol ratios, lowered inflammatory markers, dramatically improved triglyceride readings and improvement in both insulin sensitivity and glucose control. Now a new study adds to this significant body of research and demonstrates the effectiveness of the Atkins diet for improving measures of a very serious condition called Metabolic Syndrome.

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Over the past few years, a significant amount of research- much of it reported in this newsletter- has shown that low-carb diets are effective not only for weight loss, but for improving many measures of risk for heart disease and diabetes. Now a new study from the prestigious Albert Einstein College of Medicine shows that a low-fat diet has no advantage over a low-carb diet modeled on the Atkins Advantage program in the treatment of diabetes. In fact- as we’ve said before- the low-carb diet actually has some significant advantages.

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Diabetes is a disease of uncontrolled sugar. In a nutshell, uncontrolled sugar is also a huge contributing factor to obesity and heart disease. When your blood sugar goes too high, insulin comes in to escort that extra blood sugar into the cells where it can be burned for energy. But if insulin doesn’t work effectively, you wind up with too much blood sugar and high levels of insulin and you’re on your way to big health problems down the road.

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We’ve long advocated a healthy controlled carbohydrate diet as a way of preventing or treating diabetes, but the medical establishment has been slow to catch on. And while much research has been done on low-carbohydrate diets and weight loss, until now the long-term outcomes have not been determined, although this is also true of low-fat diets as well.

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Numerous studies in a variety of settings show dramatic improvements in blood glucose control and blood lipids in type 2 diabetics consuming a low-carb diet.(1–5). When these studies included a low-fat, high-carb comparison group, the low-carb diet consistently showed superior effects on blood glucose control, medication reduction, blood lipids and weight loss.
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Most people are vaguely aware that insulin has a relationship to blood sugar levels, but unless they have diabetes or live with someone who does, they know little more than that. Our six questions and answers explain how insulin works and its relationship to metabolic syndrome.
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Low-carbohydrate diets in the management of obese patients with type 2 diabetes seem intuitively attractive due to their potent antihyperglycemic effect.

We previously reported that a 20 % carbohydrate diet was significantly superior to a 55–60 % carbohydrate diet with regard to bodyweight and glycemic control in 2 non-randomised groups of obese diabetes patients observed closely over 6 months. The effect beyond 6 months of reduced carbohydrate has not been previously reported. The objective of the present study, therefore, was to determine to what degree the changes among the 16 patients in the low-carbohydrate diet group at 6-months were preserved or changed 22 months after start, even without close follow-up. In addition, we report that, after the 6 month observation period, two thirds of the patients in the high-carbohydrate changed their diet. This group also showed improvement in bodyweight and glycemic control.

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Fructose used to enjoy something of a good reputation as sugars go, largely because, unlike other sugars, it doesn't raise blood sugar very quickly. This property made it a long-standing favorite of diabetics and those who treated them. But like so much other "conventional" wisdom, this turned out to be anything but wise.   MORE
To add to the confusion that often surrounds diabetes, two different conditions, known as type 1 and type 2 diabetes, share the name. Both types involve insulin, the hormone that facilitates the movement of glucose into cells to be burned or stored. Simply put, type 1 diabetes reflects a problem in insulin production that results in low insulin levels. Type 2, on the other hand, reflects a problem in insulin action (also known as insulin resistance), which results in high insulin levels. Type 2 occurs mainly in adults and is the much more common form, representing 85 to 90 percent of all cases worldwide.   MORE
Find out why diabetes and heart disease are inextricably linked—and how to beat them.   MORE
This insidious disease usually takes a fairly predictable journey. Here is a road map to help you take a detour before you get too far along the route to diabetes.   MORE
A new study has added to the growing amount of research showing that vitamin C- as well as a high intake of vegetables and fruits- may have protective effects against diabetes.
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Disclaimer: Nothing contained on this Site is intended to provide health care advice. Should you have any health care-related questions, please call or see your physician or other health care provider. Consult your physician or health care provider before beginning the Atkins Diet as you would any other weight loss or weight maintenance program. The weight loss phases of the Atkins Diet should not be used by persons on dialysis or by pregnant or nursing women.