SCIENCE: ARTICLES & LIBRARY


This Quick Study will focus on how carbohydrates affect blood sugar and contribute to diseases such as diabetes.   MORE
Recently, a new study in the Archives of Internal Medicine received a flurry of media attention.
The study authors started by admitting that low-carbohydrate dieting was indeed effective, not only for weight loss, but for reducing insulin resistance, lowering triglyceride concentrations and for raising HDL (so-called “good” cholesterol). The researchers wanted to see if they could design a low-carbohydrate diet that retained the proven weight-loss benefits of low-carb plans like Atkins and also help people improve their cholesterol while following a vegetarian, vegan approach.   MORE
Lose weight? Live longer? Maybe your mom was right when she told you to eat your vegetables. Fortunately, vegetables are an important component of the Atkins Nutritional Approach. Even in Induction, 12 to 15 grams daily of Net Carbs should come from up to six cups of salad and up to two cups of cooked vegetables (depending on which vegetables you choose). Your choices become even more plentiful as you move through subsequent phases of Atkins. Read on for more reasons why you need to eat your vegetables.
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The American Diabetes Association, an organization whose mission statement is "to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by (it)", clearly has it's heart in the right place. Trouble is, in our opinion, they've traditionally been behind the curve of cutting edge science and research when it comes to dietary recommendations.   MORE

Summary:

The following information was written by Atkins professionals.

This study evaluated the effect a ketogenic diet had on the exercise capacity of eight healthy men. Subjects were placed in either a mixed diet group or a ketogenic group. The ketogenic diet consisted of 50% of calories derived from fat, 45% from protein and 5% from carbohydrate. After three days on the diet, subjects performed an exercise test in which they worked out at varying intensities. In comparison to subjects on the mixed diet, those on the ketogenic diet displayed increased maximal oxygen consumption (the amount of oxygen taken in by the lungs per minute, which is an excellent predictor of overall fitness). Moreover, the ketogenic subjects showed a decreased respiratory exchange ratio, meaning more fat was burned for energy. Finally, the ketogenic group showed a shift in the lactate threshold toward higher exercise loads. When the amount of lactate in the blood reaches a certain level at a certain intensity, performance is impaired; this point occurred after a longer duration of time at a higher intensity level of exercise. Blood lactic acid levels before and after exercise as well as blood pH were also lower. The ketogenic diet also lowered insulin concentration. The authors concluded that a short-term ketogenic diet does not impair, but in fact increases, aerobic exercise capacity, as indicated by an elevated maximal oxygen consumption and elevated lactate threshold.

 

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We’ve long advocated a healthy controlled carbohydrate diet as a way of preventing or treating diabetes, but the medical establishment has been slow to catch on. And while much research has been done on low-carbohydrate diets and weight loss, until now the long-term outcomes have not been determined, although this is also true of low-fat diets as well.

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To ensure that consumers know what is in the foods they buy, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires that the packaging of every manufactured food product display certain information.

  • Ingredients must be listed in descending order of weight.
  • Labeling must also include a Nutrition Facts panel.
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A report published in the prestigious Archives of Internal Medicine (Feb 13, 2006) adds more evidence to the accumulating research showing that low-carb diets get weight off. The report- which analyzed the findings of five major studies comparing low-fat and low-carb diets-- found that low-carb diets do indeed help people shed pounds more quickly than low-fat regimines.

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Inflammation is a silent killer. While inflammation has flown under the radar as a risk factor for disease, it’s beginning to get a huge amount of attention. It started in 2002, when the American Heart Association journal “Circulation” published an article called “inflammation and atherosclerosis” (1) which detailed important links between the biology of inflammation and the mechanisms of heart disease. We now know that the inflammatory response – which often goes undetected in our bodies – is a contributing factor in a host of diseases including Alzheimer’s, cancer, strokes, diabetes and obesity.
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PREVENTION IS KEY
Did you know that there’s no scientific evidence that eating a low-fat diet is linked to improved heart health? And that there is persuasive and consistent evidence that eating a low-carb diet can protect your heart? Find out more about how to prevent heart disease and the research that supports a low-carb diet.
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Two new studies presented at the Endocrine Society’s 91st Annual Meeting in Washington DC offer additional evidence for the value of a low-carb diet, not just for weight loss, but for overall health.   MORE

As you move through the four phases of the Atkins Nutritional Approach, the trick is to increase your intake of carbohydrates that are unprocessed and full of nutrients.

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The following information was written by Atkins professionals.

The purpose of this study was to assess metabolic adaptations to a high-fat diet in endurance cyclists. Sixteen endurance-trained cyclists were randomly assigned to one of two diet groups for a period of 15 days. One group remained on their habitual diet (30% of calories from fat) while the other group consumed a high-fat diet (69% of calories from fat) of the same caloric value. Results revealed that the level of certain enzymes involved in fat metabolism was elevated, signaling a shift from burning carbohydrate for energy to burning fat for energy. This change in fuel utilization occurred within five days of switching to the high-fat diet. Subjects also used less muscle glycogen (stored carbohydrate) after 15 days of the high-fat diet. The authors concluded that consuming a high-fat diet for as little as five to 10 days significantly alters the body’s fuel selection from carbohydrate to fat without altering cycling performance.

 

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When you make smart carbohydrate choices, you need to know which ones have the greatest impact on your blood sugar and which do not.

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Research confirms the long-term advisability of eating foods with a low glycemic rating.   MORE
The history of science is filled with brilliant discoveries that were not warmly welcomed. In fact, it’s almost a truism that it takes about 50 years before a revolutionary concept is truly accepted by the mainstream, particularly when that concept challenges prevailing dogma.   MORE

Everything old is new again.

The latest buzzword in nutrition may be “low glycemic".  You’ve probably heard the term “low glycemic” bandied about in the media and in discussions about weight loss. You may have even come across some food products labeled as such.

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When you follow the Atkins Diet, aka the Atkins Nutrition Approach, you actually count grams of Net Carbs, which represent the total carbohydrate content of the food minus the fiber content and sugar alcohols (if in the product). The Net Carbs number reflects the grams of carbohydrate that significantly impact your blood sugar level and therefore are the only carbs you need to count when you do Atkins. Foods that are low in Net Carbs such as nutrient-dense vegetables and fruits don’t have a significant impact on blood sugar and therefore are less likely to interfere with weight loss.
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When you follow the Atkins Nutrition Approach, you actually count Net Carbs, which means the total carbohydrate content of the food minus the fiber content.  The Net Carb number reflects the grams of carbohydrate that significantly impact your blood sugar level. 

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Disclaimer: Nothing contained on this Site is intended to provide health care advice. Should you have any health care-related questions, please call or see your physician or other health care provider. Consult your physician or health care provider before beginning the Atkins Diet as you would any other weight loss or weight maintenance program. The weight loss phases of the Atkins Diet should not be used by persons on dialysis or by pregnant or nursing women.